MIT engineers create a revolutionary stamp-sized device to provide hassle-free ultrasound of internal organs

organs

MIT has a postage stamp-sized device that sticks to the skin and can provide continuous ultrasound imaging of internal organs

Cambridge: Currently, ultrasound requires bulky and specialized equipment available only in hospitals and doctor’s offices. But a new design by MIT engineers could make the technology as portable and accessible as buying patches from the pharmacy.
The engineers present the design for a new ultrasound sticker – a postage stamp-sized device that sticks to the skin and can provide continuous ultrasound imaging of internal organs for 48 hours.

The researchers applied the stickers to volunteers and showed that the devices produced high-resolution live images of major blood vessels and deeper organs such as the heart, lungs and stomach. The stickers maintained a strong adhesion and recorded changes in underlying organs as volunteers performed various activities, such as sitting, standing, jogging and cycling.

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The current design requires the stickers to be connected to instruments that translate the reflected sound waves into images.

The researchers point out that the stickers, even in their current form, could have immediate applications: for example, the devices could be applied to patients in hospital, similar to heart-monitoring ECG stickers, and could continuously image internal organs without the need for a technician. needed to hold a probe in place for a long time.

If the devices can work wirelessly — a goal the team is currently working toward — the ultrasound stickers could be made into wearable imaging products that patients can take home from a doctor’s office or even buy at a pharmacy.

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“We imagine a few patches applied to different locations on the body, and the patches would communicate with your mobile phone, where AI algorithms would analyze the images on demand,” said study senior author Xuanhe Zhao. , professor of mechanical engineering and civil and civil engineering. environmental engineering at MIT.

“We believe we have opened a new era of wearable imaging: with a few spots on your body, you could see your internal organs,” he added.

Disclaimer: This story was published by a news service and nothing except the headline has been changed by Times now.

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