Mysterious Sinkhole Leaves Chilean Officials Puzzled

Mysterious Sinkhole Leaves Chilean Officials Confused

Lundin Mining said the sinkhole did not affect workers or members of the community.

Santiago:

Chilean authorities on Monday began investigating a mysterious sinkhole about 25 meters (82 feet) in diameter that appeared over the weekend in a mining area in the north of the country.

Chilean media showed aerial photos of the land sinkhole operated by a Canadian Lundin Mining copper mine, about 665 kilometers (413 miles) north of the capital Santiago.

The National Bureau of Geology and Mining (Sernageomin) became aware of the sinkhole on Saturday and sent specialized personnel to the area, the agency’s director, David Montenegro, said in a statement.

“There is a considerable distance, about 200 meters (656 feet), to the bottom,” Montenegro said. “We didn’t detect any material down there, but we did see the presence of a lot of water.”

Sernageomin reported the closure of areas from the entrance to the work site of the Alcaparrosa mine, located near the sinkhole.

In a statement released Monday afternoon, Lundin Mining said the sinkhole did not affect workers or members of the community.

“The nearest home is more than 600 meters (1,969 feet) away, while any populated area or public service is nearly a kilometer from the affected zone,” the statement said.

Lundin Mining owns 80% of the property and the rest is owned by Sumitomo Corporation in Japan.

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and has been published from a syndicated feed.)

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